Awards and prizes

Emeritus member of ACFAS 2008

During its 76th congress held in Quebec City, the Association francophone pour le savoir (ACFAS) appointed Yves Gingras as an emeritus member of the organization. This honor was bestowed upon him in recognition for his work and many contributions to the ACFAS.


Prix Jacques-Rousseau 2007

In the Gala des sciences, held last October, the Association francophone pour le savoir (ACFAS) awarded the Prix Jacques-Rousseau to Yves Gingras. Since 1980, this award has been given to scientists whose accomplishments have gone beyond their respective disciplines or areas of specialization, and who have successfully bridged the gap between different fields. Yves Gingras was selected as this year’s recipient for his many contributions to the field of STS, both in Quebec and internationally Click for more information


Prix Gérard-Parizeau 2005

On April 14, 2005, Yves Gingras received the Prix Gérard-Parizeau “in recognition of his exceptional work and his commitment to the promotion of the vast and complex field of history of science in Quebec”. This prize, which includes a $30,000 grant, is given every two years to a history professor or researcher in Quebec whose achievements in the field have been judged to be exceptional.

 

» Press release (in French)
» More information (in French)


Prix Ivan Slade 2001

Yves Gingras won the Ivan Slade Prize in 2001, along with £300. This award is given every two years by the British Society for the History of Science.

The following was published by the committee responsible for choosing the recipient:

The Ivan Slade Prize is awarded by the BSHS biennially for an essay (published or unpublished) making the best critical contribution to the history of science. The 2001 competition has been awarded to Professor Yves Gingras, of the Université du Québec à Montréal for an essay on «The Social and Epistemological Consequences of the Mathematization of Physics». The judges felt that it addressed an important theme in an innovative manner, was well focussed, documented and researched, and was particularly crisp and clear in expression. It offered a critical reevaluation of the unintended consequences of Newton’s conjectures. Professor Gingras argues that prior to Newton everybody could understand a mechanical block universe more or less intuitively. Before Newton’s work, knowledge had always been manifest – simply by reading the Book of Nature all knowledge would be revealed – especially in theistic societies. With Newton’s use of mathematics in his physical theories many people could no longer understand or comprehend the world. That is, for many learned people Newton’s scientific innovations led to an ‘un-understandability’ of the world in which they lived. The judges appreciated the subtlety and insight of the author’s argument, and saw in the paper the methodological originality that the prize is intended to recognize.


Prix Michel-Brunet 1988

Yves Gingras, Luc Chartrand and Raymond Duchesne were awarded the Prix Michel-Brunet of the Institut d’histoire de l’Amérique française for their book, Histoire des sciences au Québec, in 1988.


Other distinctions

Yves Gingras was a finalist for the Jean-Charles-Falardeau prize of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences for his book, Les origines de la recherche scientifique au Canada. Le cas des physiciens, in 1992.

Yves Gingras was a finalist for the Governor General’s Award (in the “translation” category) for his book, Physics and the Rise of Scientific Research in Canada (translated by Peter Keating), in 1992.

Yves Gingras, Peter Keating and Camille Limoges received a  Mention aux Prix du ministre de l'Éducation 1998-1999 for developing a distance education course in the history of science. This mention was accompanied by a certificate and an original sculpture.

Yves Gingras received a Mention special d’honneur at the Gala d’excellence of the  Cégep Limoilou in 2001.